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Beware to leave a mark at Nama

Fashion 263 with Fafadzwa Zimoyo

Happy fashion Saturday.

It is that time of the year when fashion designers and celebs showcase their style on the red carpet. Some may take gongs in their awards categories and in fashion statements while others may lose both.

Again it is also sad that not everyone hits the mark and it may have something to do with these questionable outfits.

Today all roads lead to the Rainbow Towers for the National Arts Merit Awards (Nama) and all fashion eyes will be on the red carpet.

Tip from your fashion expert: if attending the awards show, make sure to leave a lasting impression with your fashion statement.

The theme for this year is “African Royalty”.

With that theme which resonate well with African renaissance, it is important to dress in sync with the theme and give people something to talk about for the year.

Meanwhile, last week, I got emails from people asking about the work attire and etiquette for both male and female.

You know when such issues are raised, it means there is something wrongly done by some colleagues.

Just like music, dressing is also an art.

You need to understand the difference between dressing to impress and expressing yourself. Working from home has many advantages including the ability to attend conference calls in your sweats and send emails at 2pm while in pyjamas.

But at some point, you will most likely have meetings with sources, clients, investors, donors, or other business professionals and you will need to be properly dressed.

My stylist always tells me, “Overdressing can be seen as trying too hard, while under-dressing will appear as though you do not care about getting the job.”

The right attitude, combined with the right attire, can help you seal the deal in face-to-face situations.

So dressing for work is very important.

Remember the problem with appearance is that it translates to performance.

In today’s workplace, where casual wear is becoming increasingly popular, it can be tricky to understand the rules of appearance.

In many workplaces, how you dress is critical. For example, if you design and produce clothes to women’s shops especially for retail, showing up wearing something from your product line may sound like a good idea, but the wrong outfit will cost you the contract. It is better to bring product samples to serve as a model for your clothing line.

Your attire should not upstage an event or the person you are meeting with and you want to be remembered for your business sense and not for your lacy top or stilettos.

Whether you like it or not, the way you look plays a role in your success in the modern workplace.

Here are quick guides for workplace dressing

Understand what’s appropriate in your industry.
“Everyone draws their lines differently,” says etiquette coach Barbara Pachter.

Make sure your clothes fit.
It may sound obvious, but many get it wrong.

If your clothes are too big or too small, they are not going to look good. Ensuring a proper fit applies to everything you are wearing. I remember one incident one interviewer said he was distracted by a man’s short tie.

Don’t wear strong perfume or cologne
“Anything that anyone else can smell is not good,” said Thembinkosi Matongo of Harare.

To get an idea of whether someone can smell you or not, ask someone you trust.

Wear well-kept, polished shoes
One boss told me the first thing he notices about a candidate is his or her shoes. Make sure your shoes are polished and in good condition.

Wear rich colours to portray authority.
You should pay attention to your colour choices. Darker colours usually convey a stronger impression than lighter ones. If you’re giving a presentation, make sure the colour you’re wearing doesn’t blend in with the background behind you.

Both men and women have to be cautious with bright colours.

Clothes that are too flashy can be distracting and the visual equivalent of shouting.

Don’t miss next week’s edition of the Nama fashion red carpet alert moments

Source :

the herald

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