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Schools get nod to hike fees

GOVERNMENT has given schools the greenlight to increase 2019 tuition fees and levies, but only after seeking approval from the Primary and Secondary Education ministry.

BY NQOBANI NDLOVU/DUDUZILE NDLUKULWANI

In a circular to principal directors, head of office directors, provincial education directors, primary and secondary school heads, teacher associations and trust schools, Primary and Secondary Education ministry secretary Tumisang Thabela yesterday told schools to submit applications if they want to increase fees.

“Statutory Instrument (SI) 1597A of 2007 gives the official requirements for the approval of fees. It recognised that the level of fees and levies charged reflect the economic environment and in the case of some schools, significant revenue is required following the withdrawal of the Government Teachers Grant to schools that previously received them,” the circular read.

“In light of the above, schools that wish to increase fees and levies need to submit their applications to the Secretary for Primary and Secondary Education and approval has to be received by the schools before any increases are effected.”

Thabela added: “In order for the secretary to appreciate the basis upon which the levies are calculated, schools need to submit together with the application, the following: current audited accounts, minutes of a properly constituted meeting of no less than 20% of the school parents assembly, proposed budget.”

Primary and Secondary Education minister Paul Mavima yesterday said schools that had increased tuition fees should revoke them and submit fresh applications.

“Those who had already increased their fees for next year… this will be revoked as they have to follow the procedure of applying for the increment,” Mavima told Southern Eye.

The prices of uniforms, textbooks and other school stationery have gone up, with some now priced in hard currency.

Zimbabweans are grappling with basic goods and services price hikes owing to exchange rate disparities between the bond note and the United States dollar on the black market.

Government insists that the surrogate bond note and the greenback trade at the rate of 1:1.

Source: Newsday

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